Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System…

Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System WMS

PACIOOS:as_comp_all_road PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_coconutpoint_bathy_2002 PACIOOS:as_comp_all_road
Service health Now:
Interface
Web Service, OGC Web Map Service 1.3.0
Keywords
WFS, WMS, GEOSERVER, PacIOOS, IOOS, ocean observing, Pacific, US Affiliated Territories
Fees
NONE
Access constraints
NONE
Supported languages
No INSPIRE Extended Capabilities (including service language support) given. See INSPIRE Technical Guidance - View Services for more information.
Data provider

Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) (unverified)

Contact information:

Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS)

Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS)

Work:
University of Hawaii at Manoa, POST Building, Room 105A, 96822 Honolulu, USA

Email: 

Phone: +18089566556

Service metadata
No INSPIRE Extended Capabilities (including service metadata) given. See INSPIRE Technical Guidance - View Services for more information.

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PacIOOS stores and serves datasets and imagery for and on behalf of the US Pacific Territories and affiliated territories. Datasets are reproduced for the primary purpose of visualization and exploration of the datasets. Datasets are re-projected to WGS84 but are available in their original projections. Metadata is available when it has been received. A compliant implementation of WMS 1.1.1 plus most of the SLD 1.0 extension (dynamic styling). Can also generate PDF, SVG, KML, GeoRSS Reference to PacIOOS is requested if accessing or making use of the datasets within.

Available map layers (466)

Roads - American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_comp_all_road)

Roads of American Samoa, compiled from: Roads - Tutuila, Roads - Aunu'u, Roads - Ofu & Olosega, Roads - Tau.

Building Footprints - Aunu'u (PACIOOS:as_dw_aun_bldngs)

Building Footprints of Aunu'u, American Samoa

Flood Hazard Zones - Aunu'u, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_aun_femafirm)

FEMA Flood hazard zones for Aunu'u, American Samoa.

Shoreline - Aunu'u, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_aun_shore)

Shoreline of Aunu'u, American Samoa

Wetland, Agreed Line - Leone (PACIOOS:as_dw_leo_awl)

Leone Agreed Wetland Line - Tutuila, American Samoa

Malaeimi Special Management Area (PACIOOS:as_dw_mal_sma)

Malaeimi Special Management Area, Tutuila, American Samoa

Administrative Boundary for Coastal Management Program - Manua (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_ascmp)

Administrative Boundary for Coastal Management Program - Manua: Ofu, Olosega, & Tau, American Samoa

County Boundaries - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_cntybndrs)

County Boundaries of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u

Elevation Contours, 10m - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_cont_10m)

10m elevation contours of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u, American Samoa

Elevation Contours, 20m - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_cont_20m)

20m elevation contours of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u, American Samoa

Elevation Contours, 50m - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_cont_50m)

50m elevation contours of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u, American Samoa

Flood Hazard Zones - Ofu and Olosega, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_femafirm)

FEMA Flood hazard zones for the islands of Ofu and Olosega, American Samoa

Shoreline - Manu'a Islands, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_shore)

Shoreline of the Manu'a Islands (Manu'a, Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u), American Samoa

Village Boundaries - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_vilbndrs)

Village boundaries of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u, American Samoa

Watersheds, Major - Manu'a (PACIOOS:as_dw_manall_wshed_major)

Major Watersheds of Manu'a: Ofu, Olosega & Ta'u, American Samoa

Wetland, Jurisdictional Line - Nuuuli (PACIOOS:as_dw_nuu_jwl)

Nuuuli Jurisdictional Wetland Line - Tutuila, American Samoa

Shoreline - Ofu, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_ofu_shore)

Shoreline of Ofu, American Samoa

Shoreline - Olosega, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_olo_shore)

Shoreline of Olosega, American Samoa

Shoreline - Rose Atoll, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_ros_shore)

Shoreline of Rose Atoll, American Samoa

Shoreline - Swains Atoll, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_swa_shore)

Shoreline of Swains Atoll, American Samoa

Village Boundaries - Swains Island (PACIOOS:as_dw_swa_vilbndrs)

Village boundaries of Swains Island, American Samoa

Building Footprints - Ta'u (PACIOOS:as_dw_tau_bldng)

Building Footprints of Ta'u, American Samoa

Flood Hazard Zones - Ta'u, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tau_femafirm)

Flood hazard zones for for the island of Ta'u, American Samoa

Shoreline - Ta'u, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tau_shore)

Shoreline of Ta'u, American Samoa

Administrative Boundary for Coastal Management Program - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_ascmp)

Administrative Boundary for Coastal Management Program - Tutuila, American Samoa

Building Footprints - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_bldngs)

Building Footprints of Tutuila, American Samoa

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (1m), Coconut Point, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_coconutpoint_bathy_2002)

This is a high-resolution (1m) bathymetric grid with negative z values. The data were collected by the USF Center for Coastal Ocean Mapping with the Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam system (Co-chief Scientists, David Naar and Brian Donahue). An Applanix POSMV 320 V3 system was used for real-time positions and vessel attitude (heading, pitch, roll, and heave). An AML (Applied Microsystems LTD.) SV plus was used to measure sound velocities in the water column. The data were collected at Coconut Point on November 10th, 2002 aboard a Motor Vessel Lady Ana.

Elevation Contours, 10m - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_cont_10m)

10m elevation contours of Tutuila, American Samoa

Elevation Contours, 20m - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_cont_20m)

20m elevation contours of Tutuila, American Samoa

Elevation Contours, 50m - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_cont_50m)

50m elevation contours of Tutuila, American Samoa

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (1m), Fagaitua Bay, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_fagaitua_bathy_2001)

This is a 1-m bathymetric grid of high-resolution, shallow water multibeam echo-soundings gathered by the Kongsberg Simrad EM-3000 system on a boat owned by the America Samoa Government (ASG), Dept. of Marine & Wildlife Resources (DMWR). Simrad EM-3000 is a 300 kHz system that fans out up to 121 beams at a 130 deg. angle, yielding swaths that are up to 4 times the water depth. The system can capture depths in the 3-150 m range at survey speeds of 3-12 knots. With differential GPS, the system is capable of centimeter resolution with an accuracy of 10-15 cm. Grid size spacing may be 30 cm to 15 m for depths in the 3-150 m range. Xyz data from cleaned, tide-corrected soundings were gridded in MbSystem and then converted to an ArcInfo grid with ArcGMT. Grid spacing is 1-m, accuracy is ~24 m, coordinates decimal degrees, WGS84 datum. Differential corrections not applied.

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (1m), Fagatele Bay, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_fagatele_bathy_2002)

This is a high-resolution (1m) bathymetric grid with negative z values. The data were collected by the USF Center for Coastal Ocean Mapping with the Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam system (Co-chief Scientists, David Naar and Brian Donahue). An Applanix POSMV 320 V3 system was used for real-time positions and vessel attitude (heading, pitch, roll, and heave). An AML (Applied Microsystems LTD.) SV plus was used to measure sound velocities in the water column. The data were collected in Fagatele Bay on November 10th, 2002 aboard a Motor Vessel Lady Ana.

Bathymetry, Fagatele Bay (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_fagatele_bathy_xxxx)

Bathymetry, Fagatele Bay. No metadata - date unknown.

Flood Hazard Zones - Tutuila, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_femafirm)

FEMA Flood hazard zones for the island of Tutuila, American Samoa

Simrad EM-120 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid, Tutuila Flanks, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_flanks_bathy_2001)

This is bathymetric grid from data collected with the Kongsberg Simrad EM 120 systems aboard the R/V Revelle, Leg 10 of the Drift Expedition (Cruise DRFT10RR), Pago Pago to Pago Pago, March 7-8, 2002 (Chief Scientist, David Naar, NSF/NOAA funding to Naar and Wright). This one day cruise (along with other multibeam data mined from the archives) enabled complete coverage of the mid to deeper water flanks of Tutuila. The entire north flank of the island and some multibeam data gaps along the southern flank have been mapped, revealing some new volcanic cones (at least 6 off the northern flank), as well as the shape (and more accurate location) of charted (but unmapped) banks.

Hydrography - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_hydrobiol)

Hydrography of Tutuila

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (2m), National Park of American Samoa (Tutuila) (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_natpark_bathy_2001)

This is a 2-m bathymetric grid of high-resolution, shallow water multibeam echo-soundings gathered by the Kongsberg Simrad EM-3000 system on a boat owned by the America Samoa Government (ASG), Dept. of Marine & Wildlife Resources (DMWR). Simrad EM-3000 is a 300 kHz system that fans out up to 121 beams at a 130 deg. angle, yielding swaths that are up to 4 times the water depth. The system can capture depths in the 3-150 m range at survey speeds of 3-12 knots. With differential GPS, the system is capable of centimeter resolution with an accuracy of 10-15 cm. Grid size spacing may be 30 cm to 15 m for depths in the 3-150 m range. Xyz data from cleaned, tide-corrected soundings were gridded in MbSystem and then converted to an ArcInfo grid with ArcGMT. Grid spacing is 2-m, accuracy is ~24 m, coordinates decimal degrees, WGS84 datum. Differential corrections not applied.

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (5m), Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_pagopago_bathy_2001)

This is a 5-m bathymetric grid of high-resolution, shallow water multibeam echo-soundings gathered by the Kongsberg Simrad EM-3000 system on a boat owned by the America Samoa Government (ASG), Dept. of Marine & Wildlife Resources (DMWR). Simrad EM-3000 is a 300 kHz system that fans out up to 121 beams at a 130 deg. angle, yielding swaths that are up to 4 times the water depth. The system can capture depths in the 3-150 m range at survey speeds of 3-12 knots. With differential GPS, the system is capable of centimeter resolution with an accuracy of 10-15 cm. Grid size spacing may be 30 cm to 15 m for depths in the 3-150 m range. Xyz data from cleaned, tide-corrected soundings were gridded in MbSystem and then converted to an ArcInfo grid with ArcGMT. Grid spacing is 5-m, accuracy is ~24 m, coordinates decimal degrees, WGS84 datum. Differential corrections not applied.

Village Populations, 1960-2000 - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_pop_19602000)

Tutuila Village Populations 1960 - 2000

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (1m), Taema Bank, American Samoa, 2001 (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_taema_bathy_2001)

This is a 1-m bathymetric grid with negative depth values of high-resolution multibeam echo-soundings gathered in May 2001 by the Kongsberg Simrad EM-3000 system on a boat owned by the America Samoa Government (ASG), Dept. of Marine Wildlife Resources (DMWR). Simrad EM-3000 is a 300 kHz system that fans out up to 121 beams at a 130 deg. angle, yielding swaths that are up to 4 times the water depth. The system can capture depths in the 3-150 m range at survey speeds of 3-12 knots. With differential GPS, the system is capable of centimeter resolution with an accuracy of 10-15 cm. Grid size spacing may be 30 cm to 15 m for depths in the 3-150 m range. An AML (Applied Microsystems LTD.) sound velocity probe was used to measure sound velocities at the transducer interface in real time and conduct sound velocity casts. Velocity casts were done by lowering the sensor to a maximum of 30 meters in one meter intervals.

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (1m), Taema Bank, American Samoa, 2002 (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_taema_bathy_2002)

This is a high-resolution (1m) bathymetric grid with negative z values. The data were collected by the USF Center for Coastal Ocean Mapping with the Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam system (Co-chief Scientists, David Naar and Brian Donahue). An Applanix POSMV 320 V3 system was used for real-time positions and vessel attitude (heading, pitch, roll, and heave). An AML (Applied Microsystems LTD.) SV plus was used to measure sound velocities in the water column. The data were collected on Taema Bank on November 9th, 2002 aboard a Motor Vessel Lady Ana.

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (10m), Transit Around Tutuila, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_transit_bathy_2001)

This is a 10-m bathymetric grid of high-resolution, shallow water multibeam echo-soundings gathered by the Kongsberg Simrad EM-3000 system on a boat owned by the America Samoa Government (ASG), Dept. of Marine & Wildlife Resources (DMWR). Simrad EM-3000 is a 300 kHz system that fans out up to 121 beams at a 130 deg. angle, yielding swaths that are up to 4 times the water depth. The system can capture depths in the 3-150 m range at survey speeds of 3-12 knots. With differential GPS, the system is capable of centimeter resolution with an accuracy of 10-15 cm. Grid size spacing may be 30 cm to 15 m for depths in the 3-150 m range. Xyz data from cleaned, tide-corrected soundings were gridded in MbSystem and then converted to an ArcInfo grid with ArcGMT. Grid spacing is 10-m, accuracy is ~24 m, coordinates decimal degrees, WGS84 datum. Differential corrections not applied.

Simrad EM-3000 Multibeam Bathymetry Grid (2m), Vatia Bay, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_vatia_bathy_2003)

This is a high-resolution (2m) bathymetric grid with negative z values. The data were collected by the USF Center for Coastal Ocean Mapping with the Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam system (Co-chief Scientists, David Naar and Brian Donahue). An Applanix POSMV 320 V3 system was used for real-time positions and vessel attitude (heading, pitch, roll, and heave). An AML (Applied Microsystems LTD.) SV plus was used to measure sound velocities in the water column. The data were collected at Vatia Bay in 2003.

Watersheds, Minor - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tut_wshed_minor)

Minor Watersheds of Tutuila

County Boundaries - Tutuila (PACIOOS:as_dw_tutaun_cntybndrs)

County Boundaries of Tutuila

Shoreline - Tutuila and Aunu'u, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tutaun_shore)

Shorelines of Tutuila and Aunu'u, American Samoa

Wetlands, American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_dw_tutma_ppcwshedstdy)

American Samoa Wetlands from Pederson ASEPA watershed study

ESI - Benthic Habitats (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_benthic)

Benthic Habitats of American Samoa as derived from NOAA ESI studies

ESI - Birds (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_birds)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for birds.

ESI - Shorelines (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_esilines)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for shorelines.

ESI - Habitats (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_esiply)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for habitats.

ESI - Fish (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_fish)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for fish.

ESI - Insects (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_inverts)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for insects.

ESI - Marine Mammals (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_m_mammal)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for mammals.

ESI - Management Areas (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_mgt)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for management areas.

ESI - Reptiles (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_reptiles)

Environmental Sensititivity Index regions for reptiles.

ESI - Socio-Economic Points (PACIOOS:as_noaa_all_esi_soceconpts)

Environmental Sensititivity Index point locations.

National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa Boundary (PACIOOS:as_noaa_sanctuary_boundary)

National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa Boundary

Geological Attitude Observation Points - American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_nps_all_geoattpts)

Geological Attitude Observation Points, American Samoa

Volcanic Point Features (PACIOOS:as_nps_all_volcanpts)

Volcanic Point Features of American Samoa

Ofu And Olosega 5m Bathymetry: IKONOS Error Analysis (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_ofuolo_bathy_error_2004)

Bathymetric data were derived from IKONOS multispectral satellite imagery provided by the National Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (NCCMA). The original imagery, purchased from Space Imaging, Inc. (now Geoeye, Inc.), was orthorectified to correct for detected geographic offsets. Two images, acquired on different dates, were analyzed to extend the spatial coverage of the final derived bathymetry product by combining data from cloud free areas. Processing steps were based on methods originating in Lyzenga 1985 with refinement as described in Hogrefe et al. 2008 and Hogrefe 2008.

Ofu And Olosega 5m Bathymetry: IKONOS (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_ofuolo_bathy_ikonos_2004)

Bathymetric data derived from two multispectral IKONOS satellite images are mosaiced to provide near complete coverage of nearshore terrain around the islands. Bathymetry values shallower than 25 m were derived by gauging the relative attenuation of blue and green spectral radiance as a function of depth. A multiple linear regression analysis of linearized blue and green band spectral values against depth determined the variables of y-intercept, blue slope, and green slope values. Variables then used in multivariate slope intercept formula to derive depth. Variables were adjusted to improve the statistical accuracy and spatial coverage of the final derived bathymetry product. Digital image processing to derive depths conducted with ENVI 4.3 software while data editing and integration was performed using ArcGIS 9.3. This data set is for the shelf environment of Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa.

Ofu And Olosega 5m Bathymetry: Multibeam And IKONOS (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_ofuolo_bathy_merged_2004)

Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multipectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Bathymetry values shallower than 25 m were derived by gauging the relative attenuation of blue and green spectral radiance as a function of depth. A multiple linear regression analysis of linearized blue and green band spectral values against depth determined the variables of y-intercept, blue slope, and green slope values. Variables then used in multivariate slope intercept formula to derive depth. Variables were adjusted to improve the statistical accuracy and spatial coverage of the final derived bathymetry product. Digital image processing to derive depths conducted with ENVI 4.3 software while data editing and integration were performed using ArcGIS 9.3. This data set is for the shelf environment of Ofu and Olosega Islands, American Samoa.

Swains Island 40m Bathymetry (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_bathy)

Gridded bathymetry (40 m cell size) of the slope environment of Swains Island, American Samoa. Almost complete bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 7 and 4800 m. The multibeam data are from the Simrad EM300 system aboard the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai, and the Reson 8101ER system aboard the R/V AHI and were collected from 10th - 13th February 2006.

Swains Island 40m Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_bpi_structures)

Bathymetric position index (BPI) structures are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai, and it was created using the Benthic Terrain Modeler. Cell values represent one of 13 classes in an index of seafloor terrains. This data set is for Swains Island, American Samoa.

Swains Island 40m Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_bpi_zones)

Bathymetric position index (BPI) zones are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai, and it was created using the Benthic Terrain Modeler. Cell values represent one of 4 classes (crest, depression, slope, flat) in an index of seafloor terrains. This data set is for Swains Island, American Samoa.

Swains Island 40m Hard-Soft Seafloor Classification (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_hardsoft)

Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter and bathymetry derivatives at Swains Island, American Samoa. The dataset was created from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry derivatives collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai; two scales of bathymetric variance and bathymetric rugosity. Backscatter data were from a 300 kHz Simrad EM300 and a 240 kHz Reson 8101 sonar, gridded at 5 m. Very limited seafloor photographs for groundtruthing are available for Swains Island and therefore no supervised classification was performed and we are unable to visually or empirically evaluate the accuracy of the unsupervised classification seafloor substrate map. However, in locations such French Frigate Shoals, NWHI, and Tutuila, American Samoa, where ground truth data are available, the unsupervised classification method is a robust predictor of substrate type in similar depth ranges and seafloor environments. Since groundtruthing was not used to validate the unsupervised classification at Swains Island extreme caution should be used when examining these data to locate habitat of biological significance. The map should be used in conjunction with bathymetric derivatives such as rugosity, slope, and Bathymetric Position Index (BPI).

Swains Island 40m Seafloor Rugosity (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_rugosity)

Rugosity is derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the (surface area) / (planimetric area) ratio for the area contained within that cell's boundaries. They provide indices of topographic roughness and convolutedness. This data set is for Swains Island, American Samoa.

Swains Island 40m Seafloor Slope (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_swains_40m_slope)

Slope is derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in degrees) in elevation between neighboring cells derived with the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst extension. This data set is for Swains Island, American Samoa.

Tutuila 5m Bathymetry: IKONOS (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_bathy_ikonos)

Bathymetry values shallower than 25 m were derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data by gauging the relative attenuation of blue and green spectral radiance as a function of depth. The purpose of this mosaic was to improve the nearshore extent of gridded shipborne multibeam bathymetry (distributed separately). A multiple linear regression analysis of linearized blue and green band IKONOS spectral values against depth determined the variables of y-intercept, blue slope, and green slope values. Variables then used in multivariate slope intercept formula to derive depth. Variables were adjusted to improve the statistical accuracy and spatial coverage of the final derived bathymetry product. This dataset is for the shelf environment of Tutuila Island, American Samoa.

Tutuila 5m Bathymetry: Multibeam And IKONOS (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_bathy_merged)

Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data in order to include data closer to shore. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Bathymetry values shallower than 25 m were derived by gauging the relative attenuation of blue and green IKONOS spectral radiance as a function of depth. A multiple linear regression analysis of linearized blue and green band spectral values against depth determined the variables of y-intercept, blue slope, and green slope values. Variables then used in multivariate slope intercept formula to derive depth. Variables were adjusted to improve the statistical accuracy and spatial coverage of the final derived bathymetry product. Digital image processing to derive depths conducted with ENVI 4.5 software while data editing and integration was performed using ArcGIS 9.3. This dataset is for the shelf environment of Tutuila Island, American Samoa.

Tutuila 5m Bathymetry: Multibeam (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_bathy_multibeam)

Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 2 and 3409 meters (5 m grid includes data to 250 m). The bathymetry dataset includes Simrad EM300, EM3002D, and Reson 8101ER multibeam data collected during Jan. to March of 2004 and during Feb. to March of 2006.

Tutuila 5m Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_bpi_structures)

Bathymetric position index (BPI) structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry; slope; and depth. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and it was creating using the Benthic Terrain Modeler. Cell values represent one of 13 classes in an index of seafloor terrains. This data set is for the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific.

Tutuila 5m Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_bpi_zones)

Bathymetric position index (BPI) zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI, and it was creating using the Benthic Terrain Modeler. Cell values represent one of 4 classes in an index of seafloor terrains. This data set is for the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific.

Tutuila 5m Hard-Soft Seafloor Classification: Reson (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_hardsoft_reson)

Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter and bathymety derivatives at Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific. The dataset was derived using a combination of Reson 8101 backscatter, bathymetric variance, and bathymetric rugosity. The sonar frequency was 240 kHz and all data were resampled to 5 m grid cell size prior to the classification. Initial supervised classifications of the backscatter data into hard and soft seafloor substrates, using seafloor photographs for groundtruthing and to define regions of interest, were used to define unsupervised class types and to visually evaluate the accuracy of the unsupervised classification seafloor substrate map.

Tutuila 5m Hard-Soft Seafloor Classification: Simrad (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_hardsoft_simrad)

Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter and bathymety derivatives at Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific. The dataset was derived using a combination of Simrad em3002d backscatter, bathymetric variance, and bathymetric rugosity. The sonar frequencies was 300 kHz and all data were resampled to 5 m grid cell size prior to the classification. Initial supervised classifications of the backscatter data into hard and soft seafloor substrates, using seafloor photographs for groundtruthing and to define regions of interest, were used to define unsupervised class types and to visually evaluate the accuracy of the unsupervised classification seafloor substrate map.

Tutuila 5m Seafloor Rugosity (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_rugosity)

Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, using the Benthic Terrain Modeler with rugosity methods by Jeff Jenness (2003). Cell values reflect the surface area and (surface area) / (planimetric area) ratio for the area contained within that cell's boundaries. They provide indices of topographic roughness and convolutedness. This data set is for the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific.

Tutuila 5m Seafloor Slope (PACIOOS:as_pibhmc_tut_5m_slope)

Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in degrees) in elevation between neighboring cells derived with the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst extension. This data set is for the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific.

Shoreline - American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_rd_all_shore)

Shoreline of American Samoa

Building Footprints - Ofu (PACIOOS:as_rd_ofu_bldngs)

Building Footprints of Ofu, American Samoa

Swains Island Channel Exclusion (PACIOOS:as_swains_channel_exclusion)

The boundaries of the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa exclude these two channels at Swains Island to provide access to the island.

Vegetation - American Samoa (PACIOOS:as_usfs_comp_veg)

Vegetation of American Samoa, compiled from individual files for Ofu & Olosega, Rose Atoll, Swains Island, Ta'u and Tutuila

Areas of Biological Significance - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_all_areasbiolsignif)

Areas of Biological Significance in the Federated States of Micronesia

Sites of biodiversity, conservation and tourist relevance - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_all_conservsites)

Sites of biodiversity, conservation and tourism relevance in the Federated States of Micronesia

Reef Conservation Target Areas - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_all_conservtarg_reefveg)

Reef Conservation Target Areas in the Federated States of Micronesia

Protected and Managed Areas - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_all_pmas)

Protected and Managed Areas of the Federated States of Micronesia

Benthic Algae Study - Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_poh_csp_algaesurvey2005)

Benthic Algae Study in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia

Coral Monitoring Sites - Pohnpei (PACIOOS:fm_ej_poh_csp_coralsurvey2005)

Coral monitoring sites 2004-2005 in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia

Seagrass Meadows - Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_ej_poh_seagrsatlas_rea)

Seagrass meadows in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia. As identified by REA.

Coral Reefs (Distribution) - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

Coral reef distribution for the Federated States of Micronesia, from the UNEP-WCMC Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project.

State Boundaries - Fed. States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_pac_statebdry_created)

State boundaries of the Federated States of Micronesia - Approximate. Approximated from the image at Wikipedia [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_the_Federated_States_of_Micronesia_CIA.jpg]

Shoreline - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_spcusgs_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of the Federated States of Micronesia

Vegetation - Federated States of Micronesia (PACIOOS:fm_usfs_comp_veg)

Vegetation of the Federated States of Micronesia, compiled from individual files for Chuuk, Kosrae, Pohnpei and Yap.

Coastal Features - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_coastalfeats)

Coastal Features and Place Names in Guam, Mariana Islands.

Conservation Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_conservareas)

Conservation areas of Guam

Dive Sites - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_divesites)

Ecological Reserves - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_ecoresareas)

Ecological Reserves in Guam, Mariana Islands

Flood Hazard Zones - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_fldhzd_zones)

FEMA Flood Hazard Zones for Guam.

Geology - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_geol)

Geology of Guam, Mariana Islands

Municipal Boundaries - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_mncpal_bndrys_2001)

Municipal boundaries of Guam, Mariana Islands.

Marine Protected Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_mpas_2006)

Marine Protected Areas (2006) - Guam, Mariana Islands

Refuge Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_rfg_bndry)

Refuge Areas of Guam, Mariana Islands

Shoreline - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_shore)

Shoreline of Guam, Mariana Islands

Soil Types (NRCS) - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_soiltypes)

Natural Resources Conservation Service soil types of Guam, Mariana Islands.

SWM Buoys - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_swmooring)

Shallow water mooring buoys around Guam, Mariana Islands

Vegetation - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_db_all_usfs_veg)

Vegetation (USFS) of Guam, Mariana Islands.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Guam at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Guam due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Guam at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Guam due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Guam at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:gu_hcgg_all_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around [island, state] due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Coral Reefs (Distribution) - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

Coral reef distribution for Guam, from the UNEP-WCMC Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project.

Aerial Mosaic of Guam, CNMI (PACIOOS:gu_noaa_all_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Geological Attitude Observation Points - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_nps_all_geoattpts)

Geological Attitude Observation Points, Guam

Geological Faults - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_nps_all_geofaults)

Geological Faults in Guam, Mariana Islands. National Park Service (NPS) data.

Botanical Survey Transects - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_nps_wapa_botsrvy_comp)

Botanical survey transects undertaken in the War in the Pacific National Historic Park, Guam, Mariana Islands.

Geologic Cross Sections of War in the Pacific National Park, Guam (PACIOOS:gu_nps_wapa_geoxsectlines)

Geologic Cross Section Lines of War in the Pacific National Historical Park and Vicinity, Guam

War in the Pacific National Historic Park - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_nps_wapa_parkbndry)

War in the Pacific National Historic Park, Guam, Mariana Islands. Ownership data (government/private) included.

Wildlife Refuge Boundary - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_gnwr_bndry)

Wildlife Refuge Boundary - Guam

Orote Ecological Reserve Area, Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_oro_ecoresarea)

Orote Ecological Reserve Area, Guam

Drainage, all streams - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_allstrms)

Drainage, all streams - Southern Guam

Drainage, main streams - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_mainstrms)

Drainage, main streams - Southern Guam

Drainage, stream network - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_network)

Drainage, stream network - Southern Guam

Drainage, ponds & reservoirs - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_pondres)

This data set, which was initially created in 2006, contains lakes and fishponds of the island of Guam. The features were depicted of the USGS 7.5' Quadrangle Maps of 2000 (DGR's) and compared to the 2006 QuickBird imagery for currentness and exact location. The data set contains seasonal lakes which may no longer exist.

Drainage, river mouths - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_rvrmouths)

Drainage, river mouths - Southern Guam

Drainage, waterfalls - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_drain_wfall)

Drainage, waterfalls - Southern Guam

Wetlands - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_env_wlands)

Wetlands - Southern Guam

Urban areas - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_pop_urban)

Urban areas - Southern Guam

Villages - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_pop_villages)

Villages - Southern Guam

Elevation Contours, 30m - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_topo_30m)

Elevation Contours, 30m - Southern Guam

Elevation Contours, 6m - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_topo_6m)

Elevation Contours, 6m - Southern Guam

Watersheds, Major - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_wshed_major)

Watersheds, major - Southern Guam

Watersheds, Minor - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_weri_sog_wshed_subwsheds)

Watersheds, minor - Southern Guam

Guam Territorial Seashore Park (PACIOOS:gu_weri_tsp_bndry)

Guam Territorial Seashore Park. See http://documents.guam.gov/sites/default/files/E.O.-78-42-Guam-Territorial-Seashore-Park.pdf

Sport Fishing Boat Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_boatsprfishnareas)

Sport fishing boat areas around Guam, Mariana Islands

Shoreline (type) - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_coastalfeats_mod)

Shoreline type, Guam

Coastal Protection Values, Eastern Storms - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_coastalprotecteast)

Coastal Protection Value of coral reefs from tropical storms coming from the east for Guam, Mariana Islands

Coastal Protection Values, Western Storms - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_coastalprotectwest)

Coastal Protection Value of coral reefs from tropical storms coming from the west for Guam, Mariana Islands

Coral Reefs - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_coralreefs)

Coral Reefs of Guam, Mariana Islands

Coral Tourism Value - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_coraltourvalue)

Coral Tourism Value around Guam, Mariana Islands

Dive Site Popularity - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_divesites)

Dive Sites in Guam, Mariana Islands: As found in "The economic value of Guam’s coral reefs", University of Guam Marine Laboratory Technical Report No. 116, March 2007. Column "POP" corresponds to the site's popularity, with a value of 1 being 'not popular', 2 being 'popular' and 3 being 'most popular'.

Flood Plains - Southern Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_fldplancoverage)

Vector line coverage of flood plains on Guam.

Historic Sites - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_historicsites)

Historic sites in Guam, Mariana Islands

Hook Line Fishing Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_hooklinefishnareas)

Hook line fishing areas around Guam, Mariana Islands

Net Fishing Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_netfishnareas)

Net fishing areas around Guam, Mariana Islands

Park Locations - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_parks)

Parks locations in Guam, Mariana Islands

Reef Complexity - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_reefcomplexty)

Reef Complexity, Guam, Mariana Islands.

Shore Fishing Areas - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_shoresprfishnareas)

Shore fishing areas around Guam, Mariana Islands

Roads - Guam (PACIOOS:gu_yl_all_streets)

Roads of Guam, Mariana Islands

Depth Soundings - Baker Island (PACIOOS:hbi_ocs_bak_soundings)

Depth soundings around Baker Island in meters.

Shoreline - Baker Island (PACIOOS:hbi_pac_bak_shoreline)

Shoreline of Baker Island.

Shoreline - Howland Island (PACIOOS:hbi_pac_how_shoreline)

Shoreline of Howland Island.

Predicted Coral Cover in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs)

Output from a model to predict the total benthic cover of six coral species (Montipora capitata, Montipora flabellata, Montipora patulla, Porites lobata, Porites compressa, Porites meandrina) in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict coral cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Montipora capitata in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_mcap)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Montipora capitata in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict M. capitata cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Monitipora flabellata in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_mfla)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Montipora flabellata in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict M. flabellata cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Montipora patula in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_mpat)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Montipora patula in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict M. patula cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Porites compressa in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_pcom)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Porites compressa in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict P. compressa cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Porites lobata in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_plob)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Porites lobata in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict P. lobata cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Predicted Coral Cover of Pocillopora meandrina in the Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_all_ef_coralreefs_pmea)

Output from a model to predict the benthic cover of Pocillopora meandrina in the Hawaiian Islands as a proportion (0-1.0). Coral cover was modeled with boosted regression trees (BRT) in R software using data from coral cover surveys and environmental covariates derived from models and/or observations including wave height, benthic geomorphology, and downwelled irradiance. The best performing BRT model was used to predict P. meandrina cover for the entire geographic study domain. Data and model output represent conditions for shallow coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands from 0 m to -30 m depth over the time period 2000-2009. Further details on methodology and results are contained in Franklin et al. (2013) Predictive modeling of coral distribution and abundance in the Hawaiian Islands.

Multi-Hazard Inundation: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_allflood_slr0m)

Multi-hazard inundation around Honolulu. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. Shows inundation from the following two hazards: 1) Tsunami Run-Up Inundation Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation using current sea level at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaiʻi: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). 2) Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation using current sea level at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Multi-Hazard Inundation With 1-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_allflood_slr1m)

Multi-hazard inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii resulting from future sea level rise. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. Shows inundation from the following three hazards: 1) Sea Level Rise Inundation: 1-m Scenario Coastal flooding due to 1 meter of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). 2) Tsunami Run-Up Inundation With 1-m Sea Level Rise Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation including one meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaiʻi: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). 3) Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation With 1-m Sea Level Rise Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation including one meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) (1) and Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) (2 & 3) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Multi-Hazard Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_allflood_slrhm)

Multi-hazard inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii resulting from future sea level rise. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. Shows inundation from the following three hazards: 1) Sea Level Rise Inundation: 0.5-m Scenario Coastal flooding due to 0.5 meter of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). 2) Tsunami Run-Up Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaiʻi: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). 3) Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) (1) and Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) (2 & 3) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_hurflood_slr0m)

Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii using current sea level at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation With 1-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_hurflood_slr1m)

Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii including one meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Hurricane Storm Surge Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_hurflood_slrhm)

Computer model simulation of hurricane storm surge inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates a Category 4 hurricane, similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992, with a central pressure ranging from 910 to 970 mbar and maximum sustained winds ranging from 90 to 150 mph as it tracked from open ocean to land to open ocean again. The model result shows the Maximum of the Maximum Envelope of High Water (MEOW), or MOM, providing a worst-case snapshot for a particular storm category under "perfect" storm conditions. Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) Sea Level: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_mhhw)

The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge is used to represent present-day sea level for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu in the state of Hawaii. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Land elevation was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 1-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr1ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 1-m Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr1m)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 1 meter of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 2-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr2ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 3-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr3ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 4-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr4ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 5-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr5ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 6-ft Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slr6ft)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Inundation: 0.5-m Scenario: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_slrhm)

This map shows coastal flooding around Honolulu, Hawaii due to 0.5 meter of sea level rise. This scenario was derived using a National Geospatial Agency (NGA)-provided digital elevation model (DEM) based on LiDAR data of the Honolulu area collected in 2009. This "bare earth" DEM (vegetation and structures removed) was used to represent the current topography of the study area above zero elevation for the urban corridor stretching from Honolulu International Airport to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of Oahu. The accuracy of the DEM was validated using a selection of 16 Tidal Benchmarks located within the study area. The single value tidal water surface of mean higher high water (MHHW) modeled at the Honolulu tide gauge was used to represent sea level for the purposes of this study. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by Dr. Charles "Chip" Fletcher of the department of Geology & Geophysics (G&G) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Tsunami Run-Up Inundation: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_tsuflood_slr0m)

Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii using current sea level at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaii: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Tsunami Run-Up Inundation With 1-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_tsuflood_slr1m)

Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii including one meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaiʻi: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Tsunami Run-Up Inundation With 0.5-m Sea Level Rise: Honolulu, Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_csp_hono_tsuflood_slrhm)

Computer model simulation of tsunami run-up inundation around Honolulu, Hawaii including half a meter of sea level rise at mean higher high water (MHHW) as its baseline water level. The study area includes the urban corridor stretching from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki and Diamond Head along the south shore of the island of Oahu. The model simulates maximum inundation based on five major historical tsunamis that have impacted Hawaiʻi: 1) The 1946 Aleutian earthquake (8.2 Mw), 2) 1952 Kamchatka earthquake (9.0 Mw), 3) 1957 Aleutian earthquake (8.6 Mw), 4) 1960 Chile earthquake (9.5 Mw), and 5) the 1964 Alaska earthquake (9.2 Mw). Model results produced in 2014 by Dr. Kwok Fai Cheung of the department of Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Supported in part by the NOAA Coastal Storms Program (CSP) and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. While considerable effort has been made to implement all model components in a thorough, correct, and accurate manner, numerous sources of error are possible. These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation depths and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Streams (from DLNR, Division of Aquatic Resources (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_darstreams)

Streams (both perennial and non‐perennial). Accessed from State of Hawaii DBEDT GIS site.

Flood Hazard Zones - Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_floodhazardareas_g)

Flood hazard zones for the State of Hawaii including the islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, Molokai, Lanai, Kahoolawe, and Niihau. Flood hazards zones for the island of Hawaii (Big Island) are currently under review and will be provided later. These flood hazard zones were established by the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Areas that fall within the 100-year flood boundary (a.k.a. base flood or floodplain) are called Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA) and are divided into insurance risk zones A, AE, AH, AO, or VE. The term 100-year flood indicates that the area has a 1% chance of flooding in any given year. Zones X and X500 are Non-Special Flood Hazard Areas (NSFHA) and have moderate-to-low flood risk.

Government Land Ownership - Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_govjurisdiction_g)

hi_hcgg_all_parcel_labels (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_parcel_labels)

Parcels - TMK - Labels - Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_parcelintersects)

TMK Parcels - Kauai, Maui, Oahu combined (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_parcels)

Combined layer of parcels from separate parcel layers for Kauai, Maui and Oahu (hi_hcgg_kaua_parcels, hi_hcgg_maui_parcels, hi_hcgg_oahu_parcels).

TMK Parcels with Labels - Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_parcels_with_labels)

Roads Labels - County Routes - Non-Oahu (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_sdotcountyroutes_nonoahu)

Transects for Historical Shorelines of Kauai, Maui and Oahu. (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_transects)

Combined layer of transect layers for provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group for historical shoreline study. Includes shoreline change rates at the location of the transect.

Transects for Historical Shorelines of Kauai, Maui and Oahu. (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_all_transects_ft)

Combined layer of transect layers for provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group for historical shoreline study. Includes shoreline change rates at the location of the transect.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Hawaii at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Hawaii at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Hawaii at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_bigi_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around Hawaii Island (Big Island) in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

TMK Parcels - Kauai, HI (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_parcels)

Historical Shorelines of Kauai (HCGG:hi_hcgg_kaua_shore_all)

Historical shorelines provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group for historical shoreline study.

Historical Shorelines of Kauai (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_shore_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Kauai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Kauai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Kauai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Transects for Historical Shorelines of Kauai (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_kaua_tran_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates at the location of the transect.

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Kauai - Eastern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_kaua_transects_ft_e)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Kauai - Northern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_kaua_transects_ft_n)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Kauai - Southern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_kaua_transects_ft_s)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Kauai - Western Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_kaua_transects_ft_w)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Lanai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Lanai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Lanai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_lana_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Lanai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

TMK Parcels - Maui, HI (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_parcels)

Historical Shorelines of Maui (HCGG:hi_hcgg_maui_shore_all)

Historical shorelines provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group for historical shoreline study.

Historical Shorelines of Maui (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_shore_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Maui at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Maui at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Maui at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Transects for Historical Shorelines of Maui (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_maui_tran_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates at the location of the transect.

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Maui - Kihei Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_maui_transects_ft_k)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Maui - Northern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_maui_transects_ft_n)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Maui - Western Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_maui_transects_ft_w)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Molokai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Molokai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Molokai at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_molo_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Molokai in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

hi_hcgg_oahu_con_merge4_intersect (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_con_merge4_intersect)

TMK Parcels - Oahu, HI (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_parcels)

Downloaded from State of Hawaii Department of Planning website, July 2013.

Historical Shorelines of Oahu (HCGG:hi_hcgg_oahu_shore_all)

Historical shorelines provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group for historical shoreline study.

Historical Shorelines of Oahu (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_shore_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Oahu at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Oahu at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Oahu at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Oahu in the State of Hawaii due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Road Labels - Oahu (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_streetcenterline)

Road Labels - Oahu

Transects for Historical Shorelines of Oahu (PACIOOS:hi_hcgg_oahu_tran_all)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates at the location of the transect.

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Oahu - Eastern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_oahu_transects_ft_e)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Oahu - Northern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_oahu_transects_ft_n)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Oahu - Southern Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_oahu_transects_ft_s)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Transects for the HCGG Historical Shoreline Study of Oahu - Western Region (HCGG:hi_hcgg_oahu_transects_ft_w)

Provided by Hawaii Coastal Geology Group. Includes shoreline change rates (feet/year) at the location of the transect. [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/coasts/erosion/]

Shoreline - Main Hawaiian Islands (PACIOOS:hi_sohdop_all_shore)

Coastlines for the main Hawaiian islands. Source: USGS Digital Line Graphs, 1983 version. History: Extracted by OSP staff from the 1983 1:24,000 USGS Digital Line Graphs.

Shorelines - Main Hawaiian Islands (HCGG) (PACIOOS:hi_sohdop_all_shore_hcgg)

Tsunami Evacuation Zone: Hawaii (PACIOOS:hi_sohdop_all_tsunevac)

The current tsunami evacuation zone for the State of Hawaii. Merged from multiple data sources and provided by the Hawaiʻi Statewide GIS Program in 2014. The evacuation zone is a guideline and should be considered the minimum safe evacuation distance in the event of a tsunami or significant earthquake.

Shoreline - Jarvis Island (PACIOOS:jai_pac_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of Jarvis Island

Shoreline - Johnson Atoll (PACIOOS:jat_ocs_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of Johnson Atoll

Coral Reefs (Distribution) - Republic of the Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

Coral reef distribution for Republic of the Marshall Islands, from the UNEP-WCMC Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project.

Ariports - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_airports)

Atolls - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_atolls)

Bathymetric Contours (200m) - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_bathy_contours_200m)

Bathymetric Contours (200m) - Marshall Islands

Conservation Areas - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_conservareas)

Conservation Targets (Reefs) (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_conservtarg_reef)

Dive Survey Locations - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_dive_sites)

Local Government Areas (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_local_gov_areas)

Passes - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_passes)

Conservation Targets (Points) (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_point_targets)

Protected Areas - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_protected_areas)

Sea Mounts - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_sea_mounts)

Territorial Seas - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_territorial_seas)

Village Boundaries - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_mgd_maj_villages)

Village Boundaries - Marshall Islands

Majuro Bathymetry With Contours (PACIOOS:mh_sopac_maj_bathy_color)

From multibeam bathymetry surveys carried out by SOPAC from 2003-2006. This work was implemented through the project "Reducing Vulnerability of Pacific States", funded by the European Development Fund. Ocean depth measured in meters.

Majuro Atoll Bathymetry: Lagoon (PACIOOS:mh_sopac_maj_bathy_lagoon)

From multibeam bathymetry surveys carried out by SOPAC from 2003-2006. This work was implemented through the project "Reducing Vulnerability of Pacific States", funded by the European Development Fund. Ocean depth measured in meters.

Majuro Atoll Bathymetry: Eastern Reef (PACIOOS:mh_sopac_maj_bathy_reef_east)

From multibeam bathymetry surveys carried out by SOPAC from 2003-2006. This work was implemented through the project "Reducing Vulnerability of Pacific States", funded by the European Development Fund. Ocean depth measured in meters.

Shoreline - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_spc_all_shoreline)

Shorelines of the Marshall Islands

Vegetation (Draft) - Marshall Islands (PACIOOS:mh_usfs_comp_veg)

Draft USFS Vegetation for the Marshall Islands.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu0)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu1)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu2)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu3)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu4)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu5)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Ground) for Saipan at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_clu6)

This map shows the extent of flooding of low-lying inland coastal areas around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). These low-lying areas are not hydrologically connected to the ocean but have the potential for flooding based on their elevation and require more detailed analysis. The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con0_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con1_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con2_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con3_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con4_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con5_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Coastal) for Saipan at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_con6_i)

This map shows inland extent of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW), created by subtracting the NOAA VDATUM MHHW surface from a digital elevation model (DEM). The resolution of the DEM is 3 meters and was derived from the best available LiDAR data sets known to exist at the time of creation. Water levels are shown as they would appear during the highest high tides (excluding wind-driven tides). Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 0ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln0_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 0 feet of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 1ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln1_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 1 foot (0.305 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 2ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln2_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 2 feet (0.610 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 3ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln3_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 3 feet (0.914 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 4ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln4_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 4 feet (1.219 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 5ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln5_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 5 feet (1.524 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

Sea Level Rise Vulnerability (Confidence) for Saipan at 6ft above MHHW (PACIOOS:mp_hcgg_all_slr_vuln6_i)

This map shows levels of confidence of coastal flooding (inundation) around the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) due to 6 feet (1.829 m) of sea level rise above mean higher high water (MHHW). Blue areas denote a high confidence of inundation, orange areas denote a low confidence of inundation, and unshaded areas denote a high confidence that these areas will be dry at this water level. In this application, 80% is considered a high degree of confidence such that, for example, the blue areas denote locations that may be correctly mapped as "inundated" more than 8 out of 10 times. Areas with a low degree of confidence represent locations that may be mapped correctly (either as inundated or dry) less than 8 out of 10 times. Confidence mapping is a fairly complicated procedure that is explained in detail in "Mapping and Portraying Inundation Uncertainty of Bathtub-Type Models" available at "http://www.jcronline.org/doi/abs/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00118.1". In short, the method includes the uncertainty in the LiDAR-derived elevation data (root mean square error, or RMSE) and the uncertainty in the modeled tidal surface from the NOAA VDATUM MHHW (RMSE). This uncertainty is combined and mapped to show that inundation extent is not really a hard line, but rather a zone with greater and lesser chances of getting wet. Data produced in 2014 by NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM). These data do not consider future changes in coastal geomorphology and natural processes such as erosion, subsidence, or future construction. These data do not specify timing of inundation and are not appropriate for conducting detailed spatial analysis. The entire risk associated with the results and performance of these data is assumed by the user. These data should be used strictly as a planning reference and not for navigation, permitting, or other legal purposes.

QuickBird Imagery of Anatahan, CNMI, 2006 (PACIOOS:mp_hw_ana_qbirdRGB_2006)

QuickBird Imagery of Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, 2006.

QuickBird Imagery of Pagan, CNMI, 2006 (PACIOOS:mp_hw_pag_qbirdRGB_2006)

QuickBird Imagery of Pagan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, 2006.

Coral Reefs (Distribution) - Northern Mariana Islands (PACIOOS:mp_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

Coral reef distribution for Northern Mariana Islands, from the UNEP-WCMC Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project.

Aerial Mosaic of Agrihan, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_agr_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Agrihan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Aerial Mosaic of Anatahan, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_ana_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Anatahan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Aerial Mosaic of Asuncion, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_asu_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Asuncion, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Benthic Habitats - Northern Mariana Islands (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_comp_swbh_habitat)

Shallow water benthic habitats of the Northern Mariana Islands

Shorelines - Northern Mariana Islands (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_comp_swbh_shore)

Shorelines of the Northern Mariana Islands

Aerial Mosaic of Guguan, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_gug_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Guguan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Aerial Mosaic of Maug, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_mau_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

Aerial Mosaic of Rota, CNMI (PACIOOS:mp_noaa_rot_swbh_mosaic_clip1km)

Aerial Mosaic of Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Anchorage locations - Saipan (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sai_anchor)

Anchorage locations, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

Beacon locations - Saipan (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sai_beacons)

Beacon locations around Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

Obstructions - Saipan, Tinian and Aguijan (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sta_obstructpoly)

Obstructions around Saipan, Tinian and Aguijan, Northern Mariana Islands

Depth Soundings - Saipan, Tinian & Aguijan (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sta_soundings)

Depth soundings around Saipan, Tinian and Aguijan, Northern Mariana Islands in meters.

Buoys - Saipan & Tinian (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sti_buoys)

Buoys around Saipan and Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

Channels - Saipan & Tinian (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sti_channels)

Channels around Saipan & Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

Landmarks - Saipan & Tinian (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sti_lmarks)

Landmarks around Saipan and Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

Obstruction Points - Saipan & Tinian (PACIOOS:mp_ocs_sti_obstructpt)

Obstruction points around Saipan and Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

QuickBird Imagery of Rota, CNMI, 2005 (PACIOOS:mp_pdc_rot_qbird_2005)

QuickBird Imagery of Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, 2005.

Vegetation - Northern Mariana Islands (PACIOOS:mp_usfs_comp_veg)

Vegetation of the Saipan, Rota & Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands. Compiled from the individual layers for each island.

Shoreline - US & Associated Territories (PACIOOS:pac_comp_all_shore)

Shorelines of all US Pacific and Associated Territories. Compiled from individual shoreline layers.

Labels - Countries (PACIOOS:pac_pac_labels_country_created)

Labels of Country Names (labels for 'Shorelines -World')

Oceania Political Boundaries (PACIOOS:pac_rd_political_bndry)

Political Boundaries of Oceania, Pacific Ocean.

Shoreline - Palmyra Atoll (PACIOOS:pat_ocs_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of Palmyra Atoll

Depth Soundings - Palmyra Atoll (PACIOOS:pat_ocs_all_soundings)

Depth Soundings around Palmyra Atoll in meters.

Coral Reefs (distribution) - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

Coral reef distribution for Palau, from the UNEP-WCMC Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project.

Shoreline - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_noaa_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of Palau

Airports - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_airports)

PALARIS airports in Palau.

Benthic Habitats - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_benthic_habitats)

NOAA benthic habitat map for Palau provided by PALARIS.

Buildings - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_bldngs)

PALARIS facility buildings in Palau.

Conservation Areas - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_conservareas)

PALARIS conservation areas in Palau.

Conservation Points - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_conservsites)

PALARIS conservation points in Palau.

Elevation Contours, 10m - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_cont_10m)

PALARIS 10m elevation contours for Palau.

Dive Sites - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_divesites)

PALARIS dive sites in Palau.

Docks - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_docks)

PALARIS docks in Palau.

Historic Sites - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_historicsites)

PALARIS historic sites in Palau.

Manholes - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_manholes)

PALARIS infrastructure layer for manholes in Palau.

Marsh Habitat - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_marsh)

PALARIS habitat layer for marsh areas in Palau.

Political Boundaries - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_political_bndry)

PALARIS political boundaries for Palau.

Political Boundary Lines - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_political_bndry_line)

PALARIS political boundary lines for Palau.

Protected Areas - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_protected_areas)

PALARIS protected conservation areas in Palau.

Roads - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_roads)

PALARIS roads in Palau.

Compact Roads - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_roads_compact)

PALARIS compact roads in Palau.

Schools - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_schools)

PALARIS schools in Palau.

Sewage Pumps - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_sewage_pumps)

PALARIS infrastructure layer of sewage pumps in Palau.

Sewer Branch Lines - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_sewer_lines)

PALARIS infrastructure layer for sewer branch lines in Palau.

Sewers - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_sewers)

PALARIS infrastructure layer of sewers in Palau.

Tourist Sites - Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_all_touristsites)

PALARIS tourist sites in Palau.

Political Boundaries - Hatohobei, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_hato_bndry)

PALARIS political boundaries for Hatohobei, Palau.

Shoreline - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for normal shoreline in Palau.

Extreme Tide - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event in Palau.

Extreme Tide +25 - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide_025)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event +25 in Palau.

Extreme Tide +50 - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide_050)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event +50 in Palau.

Extreme Tide +100 - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide_100)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event +100 in Palau.

Extreme Tide +150 - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide_150)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event +150 in Palau.

Extreme Tide +200 - Melekeok, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_mele_shore_xtide_200)

PALARIS Melekeok Risk Assessment layer for shoreline during an extreme tide event +200 in Palau.

Administrative Boundary - Ngaremeduu, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_ngar_bndry)

PALARIS conservation boundary layer for Ngaremeduu, Palau.

Political Boundaries - Sonsorol, Palau (PACIOOS:pw_plrs_sons_bndry)

PALARIS political boundaries for Sonsorol, Palau.

Vegetation - Republic of Palau (PACIOOS:pw_usfs_all_veg)

Vegetation (USFS) of Guam, Republic of Palau [DRAFT]

Shoreline - Wake Island (PACIOOS:wai_ocs_all_shoreline)

Shoreline of Wake Island

Depth Soundings - Wake Island (PACIOOS:wai_ocs_all_soundings)

Depth soundings around Wake Island in meters.

Coral Reefs (Distribution) - Wake Island (PACIOOS:wat_mcrmp_all_coralreefs)

EEZs of the US Pacific Territories (PACIOOS:wgs_USterr_eez_bdy)

EEZs of the US Pacific Territories

EEZs of the US Pacific Territories (PACIOOS:wgs_USterr_eez_bdy_east)

Exclusive Economic Zones of the US Pacific Territories.

EEZs of the US Pacific Territories (PACIOOS:wgs_USterr_eez_bdy_west)

Exclusive Economic Zones of the US Pacific Territories.

Global Distribution of Coral Reefs (2010) (PACIOOS:world_unepwcmc_coralreefs2010)

The dataset represents the global distribution of warm water coral reefs and should be seen an ‘interim’ global product. It has been compiled from a number of data sources which have been merged together by UNEP-WCMC and the WorldFish Centre in collaboration with WRI and TNC. It supersedes the dataset used in the World Atlas of Coral Reefs (2001), although some aspects of this product still originate from that data source. This amalgamated dataset has been created to further mobilise the Millennium Coral Reef Map Products and their validation. This data set should by no means replace the official release of the Millennium coral reef map and users should always check at the official sites for the most up-to-date available information. This dataset does not contain the full 5 level geomorphological categorisation. In part, for the validated products, it maintains the simplified Reefbase subset but for the remaining areas i.e. the unvalidated data and data from other sources, there is only a single class to indicate coral reef. For more information go to http://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/13

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